How do I continue my career growth?

June 2, 2015
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So you graduated! We’re guessing you’re feeling pretty happy about your student days being over. Guess again!

Lately, it seems that the flow of new information is so rapid that many of the “facts” you learned in school yesterday will be obsolete tomorrow. And, we’re sorry to be the ones to tell you this, but the only way to keep on top of the new information is to continue with your education. But now you’re the one in charge!

At Doccupations, we’re strong supporters of life-long learning. Where should you begin? Well, you can always go back to your alma mater, but we’re thinking that you need a little break. Another resource is to join your national, state and local organizations. For dental assistants, there’s the American Dental Assistants Association (http://www.adaausa.org/). Dental hygienists have the American Dental Hygienists Association (http://www.adha.org/). Office managers should check out the American Association of Dental Office Managers (http://www.dentalmanagers.com/). Dentists can join the American Dental Association (http://www.ada.org/en/). If you are a specialist, you should definitely join your specialty organization. All of these organizations post worthwhile continuing education opportunities for their members.

In addition, when it comes to life-long learning, we wholeheartedly support the Academy of General Dentistry (http://www.agd.org/). They have many membership categories, including those for recent graduates, residents, and all dental team members, with different pricing depending on which category you select. You can even join as a specialist! You’ll want to challenge yourself with the goal of obtaining their fellowship and mastership awards. (Hint: If you join immediately after dental school, your residency program will add up to 150 continuing education credits, and you’ll be well on your way toward an AGD Fellowship award!)

The formal dental organizations can be a little imposing at first. Study clubs often offer a more intimate, relaxed learning environment. So once you join your dental organization, make a point of attending one of their meetings. Introduce yourself to several people, and ask around to see if anyone belongs to a study club. You might find a new learning opportunity, and in the process, you might even make a new friend!

That’s what we call a win-win.

~Doccupations. We’ll get you connected.